Containers 101: All About Boxes

We invite you to learn more about different types of boxes and related terminology. Our goal is that with this information, you will be better equipped in deciding which type of packaging best fits your needs.​

Illustration of end loader box
Illustration of top loader box

Box Dimensions

 

Dimensions are given in the sequence of length, width and depth. Internationally, the words length, breadth, and height may be used to express these dimensions. The dimensions of a box are described based on the opening of an assembled box, which can be located on the top or the side, depending on how it is to be filled. The opening of a box is a rectangle that is, it has two sets of parallel sides. The longer of the two sides is considered its length, the shorter of the two sides is considered its width. The side perpendicular to length and width is considered the depth of the box. 

 

Dimensions can be specified for either the inside or the outside of the box. Accurate inside dimensions must be determined to ensure the proper fit for the product being shipped or stored. At the same time, palletizing and distributing the boxes depends on the outside dimensions. The box manufacturer should be informed as to which dimension is most important to the customer.

Manufacturer's Joints

 

A flat piece of corrugated fiberboard, which has been cut, slotted and stored, is called a box blank. For some box styles, in order to make a box, the two ends of the box blank must be fastened together with tape, staples or glue. The place where these two ends meet is know as the manufacturer's joint. 

 

Liquid adhesives are most often used to join the two surfaces. Often there is a glue tab, extending along one end of the box blank. This tab is scored and folded to form one corner of the box when joined. The tab can be joined to either the inside or the outside of the box. If there is no tab, the box must be joined using tape. Item 222 (see Rules and Regulations, Carrier Rules) requires a minimum 1 ¼-inch overlap with adhesive coverage of the entire contact area, and gives specifications for the tape used and the distance between the staples.Stitched Joint Not all boxes have manufacturer's joins; for example, the bliss box does not. However, most widely used box styles have a manufacturer's joint.

Taped joint
Glued joint
Box type: regular slotted container

Box Type: Regular Slotted Container (RSC)

 

This is the most common of all box styles. It offers a highly efficient way to ship almost any product with very little manufacturing waste. All the flaps are the same length and are ½ the width of the carton, so that they meet in the center of the box when folded.

Box Type: Full Overlap Carton (FOL)

 

This is the most common of all box styles. It offers a highly efficient way to ship almost any product with very little manufacturing waste. All the flaps are the same length and are ½ the width of the carton, so that they meet in the center of the box when folded.

Box Type: Full overflap carton
Box type: One piece folder

Box Type: One Piece Folder (OPF)

 

This style is very resistant to rough handling. It is similar to an RSC but its flaps are the same length as the width of the carton. When closed the outer flaps will fully overlap each other. With the overlapping flaps this style offers more cushioning on the top & bottom. When stacked on its side the extra thickness provides extra stacking strength.

Box Type: Five Panel Folder

Box Type: Five Panel Folder (5PF)

 

This style is used for long narrow products. It has extra protection on the ends with the overlapping flaps. The overlapping flaps also give this style extra stacking strength.

Box type: Half Slotted Container

Box Type: Half Slotted Container (HSC)

 

This style is similar to a RSC but it only has 1 set of flaps. This style offers easy loading and it usually has a separate cover. It can also be used as a cover.

Box Type: Tele-Bottom and Tele-Cover

Box Type: Tele-Bottom and Tele-Cover (Slotted Trays)

 

This style can be used as a cap or a lid. It also can be used as a box by itself, allowing you to place your product down then setup the box around the product. This is usually done with extra heavy product.

Die-cut Carton: 2 sided tray

Die Cut Carton: Two Sided Tray

 

Die cut carton: 2 sided rollover with a tuck

Die Cut Carton: Two Sided Rollover with a Tuck

Die Cut Carton: Two Sided Rollover with Ears

Die Cut Carton: 123 Bottom with a Tuck

Die Cut Carton: 123 Bottom with a Tuck Top

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860-584-1194

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R&R Corrugated Packaging Group, Bristol, CT